No Promissory Notes

By Ish Klein Ish Klein
The word penis is probably the most misattributed word in
English, I think. Because almost nobody has a real one.
The standards are made in Japanese or German factories.

Womb/vagina sets are unusual too if genuine.
Standards are from China; they are recycled sheepskin wallets.
I was shocked too when I heard this.

I do not have an actual either but they called
me a genius when I figured it out about the fetal
lamb/sheep skin. What else to do with all the wallets

now that there’s no money? Only barter.
I do not know what the inside of this thing looks like
but I think it looks like a brain made of mozzarella cheese.

Standard penises are made of a certain kind of plant.
An ocean weed and how it’s fitted is by body weight
at birth which is why you shouldn’t smoke

if you are pregnant, you will be blamed
even though it’s complicated to know exact reasons
as we all in the new world know better each day.

They’ve made new lingo to go with the genuine penis.
They say unicorn, I say wasabi.
Apparently, almost everyone gets green horseradish with sushi.

Wasabi takes several million years to grow,
its taste is delicate. When I mentioned Japan
earlier, I meant the motor city.

When I say Wasabi near Japan; it’s island
of slow unit dance or Remarkable Mask.
When I say new world, it’s where the newly suited go.

T-cell robots, we of lambs and plants and jellyfish that are
in our eyes which are colored by their place in the ocean.
Really, if you broke us down, you’d have quite a collection:

resins from pine, precious stones,
silver dust, and sea grass filaments,
stalks, pig livers, skin, a milk protein.

This is the equipment for the dominant standard penis holders
of the unreal, and I would love to be one with a genuine
but I have not the stomach to pull off the cunning necessary

for the genuine purse/penis license.
You barter for it; you lie.
Don’t get me wrong, it must be nice

to have options. But to get them dishonestly?
It’s bothering. I know, I know!
I have got to say goodbye to the babyhood phase.

Learn to thrive! Nobody has a father or a mother.
I know this means to thrive!
To be one’s own lover.

My sheepskin wallet is . . .
What could a person say? Stuck in the past,
tripped up by the concept of wallet?

It’s not like anything gets taken out
unless it’s rotten which it probably isn’t
because I feel okay and you look alright.

It’s that it wants to be ultimate although
a new and genuine vagina/womb set from a biped
has not been recorded in over 180 years

which means billions of here/now moments.
Which means forgotten a trillion times
and remembered exactly one plus that.

There’s not as much empty space as we thought
in the old blueprints that made donuts
in space—the halo, the Homeric lure.

The one electron penis and the drone.
I’ve been sick and found all this out because I couldn’t
get out of bed and there was a diamond near my head.

I was reading about moray eels,
their hydraulics. How they practically
fly-fish with agility.

It’s the forward going.
I’d like to go boldly.
I’ve kept a card of energy.

Wilderness saved from childhood.
Of this secret, one must be silent
so the sun can trust us.

Kids need each other.
Better they never get
separated entirely.

Contra this, I do want to fly fish.
To cast off and plant it then go with
the nylon line. Where to take off

the old wallet and give it back
to a lamb. I’ll be the promo homo
making arrangements to go to the show

where we trade our new pieces congenially
and find others, depleted by scavengers,
and get them up-and-running to better suns,

not the promised land, exactly
the opposite. Exactly the opposite
of anything promised.

Ish Klein, “No Promissory Notes” from Moving Day. Copyright © 2011 by Ish Klein.  Reprinted by permission of Canarium Books.

Source: Moving Day (Canarium Books, 2011)

 Ish  Klein

Biography

Poet and filmmaker Ish Klein grew up in Long Island and was educated at Columbia University and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Klein’s poetry collections include Moving Day (2011) and Union! (2009).
 
With both vulnerability and humor, Klein’s lyrical poems measure the strata of daily social and literary engagement. “Klein’s work consistently explores the conflict between authenticity and literary convention,” observes Boston . . .

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