Fin de Fête

By Charlotte Mew 1869–1928 Charlotte Mew
Sweetheart, for such a day
     One mustn’t grudge the score;
Here, then, it’s all to pay,
     It’s Good-night at the door.
 
Good-night and good dreams to you,—
     Do you remember the picture-book thieves
Who left two children sleeping in a wood the long night through,
     And how the birds came down and covered them with leaves?
 
So you and I should have slept,—But now,
     Oh, what a lonely head!
With just the shadow of a waving bough
     In the moonlight over your bed.

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Poet Charlotte Mew 1869–1928

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Subjects Love, Romantic Love, Relationships, Men & Women

Poetic Terms Quatrain, Rhymed Stanza

Biography

The life of turn-of-the-twentieth-century British writer Charlotte Mew was full of tragedy from beginning to end. Mew was born in London in 1869 into a family of seven children; she was the eldest daughter. While she was still a child, three of her brothers died. Later, another brother and then a sister were committed to mental hospitals in their twenties where they would spend the rest of their lives. That left only Charlotte . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Romantic Love, Relationships, Men & Women

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Victorian

Poetic Terms Quatrain, Rhymed Stanza

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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