Bright Day

By Stanley Moss b. 1925 Stanley Moss
I sing this morning: Hello, hello.
I proclaim the bright day of the soul.
The sun is a good fellow,
the devil is a good guy, no deaths today I know.
I live because I live. I do not die because I cannot die.
In Tuscan sunlight Masaccio
painted his belief that St. Peter’s shadow
cured a cripple, gave him back his sight.
I’ve come through eighty-five summers. I walk in sunlight.
In my garden, death questions every root, flowers reply.
I know the dark night of the soul
does not need God’s eye,
as a beggar does not need a hand or a bowl.

Stanley Moss, “Bright Day” from God Breaketh Not All Men’s Hearts Alike. Copyright © 2011 by Stanley Moss. Reprinted by permission of Seven Stories Press.

Source: God Breaketh Not All Men’s Hearts Alike (Seven Stories Press, 2011)

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet Stanley Moss b. 1925

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

Subjects Living, Death, Growing Old, Activities, Gardening, Arts & Sciences, Painting & Sculpture

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Rhymed Stanza

 Stanley  Moss

Biography

Stanley Moss was educated at Trinity College (Connecticut) and Yale University and makes his living as a private art dealer, specializing in Spanish and Italian Old Masters. As a child he visited Europe with his family, and after serving in World War II he taught English in Barcelona and Rome, where he became familiar with the religious and mythical figures that appear in his work.

He is the critically acclaimed author of The . . .

Continue reading this biography

Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Death, Growing Old, Activities, Gardening, Arts & Sciences, Painting & Sculpture

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Rhymed Stanza

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.