from Don Juan: Canto 1, Stanzas 47-48

By Lord Byron (George Gordon) 1788–1824 Lord Byron (George Gordon)
47
Sermons he read, and lectures he endured,
   And homilies, and lives of all the saints;
To Jerome and to Chrysostom inured,
   He did not take such studies for restraints;
But how faith is acquired, and then insured,
   So well not one of the aforesaid paints
As Saint Augustine in his fine Confessions,
Which make the reader envy his transgressions.
 
48
This, too, was a seal'd book to little Juan—
   I can't but say that his mamma was right,
If such an education was the true one.
   She scarcely trusted him from out her sight;
Her maids were old, and if she took a new one
   You might be sure she was a perfect fright,
She did this during even her husband's life—
I recommend as much to every wife.

Source: Byron: The Oxford Authors, edited by Jerome J. McGann (Oxford University Press, 1986)

Discover this poem’s context and related poetry, articles, and media.

Poet Lord Byron (George Gordon) 1788–1824

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

 Lord  Byron (George Gordon)

Biography

The most flamboyant and notorious of the major Romantics, George Gordon, Lord Byron, was likewise the most fashionable poet of the day. He created an immensely popular Romantic hero—defiant, melancholy, haunted by secret guilt—for which, to many, he seemed the model. He is also a Romantic paradox: a leader of the era’s poetic revolution, he named Alexander Pope as his master; a worshiper of the ideal, he never lost touch with . . .

Continue reading this biography

POET’S REGION England

SCHOOL / PERIOD Romantic

Report a problem with this poem

Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

This poem has learning resources.

This poem is good for children.

This poem has related video.

This poem has related audio.