The Combe

By Edward Thomas 1878–1917 Edward Thomas
The Combe was ever dark, ancient and dark.
Its mouth is stopped with bramble, thorn, and briar;
And no one scrambles over the sliding chalk
By beech and yew and perishing juniper
Down the half precipices of its sides, with roots
And rabbit holes for steps. The sun of Winter,
The moon of Summer, and all the singing birds
Except the missel-thrush that loves juniper,
Are quite shut out. But far more ancient and dark
The Combe looks since they killed the badger there,
Dug him and gave him to the hounds,
That most ancient Briton of English beasts.

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Poet Edward Thomas 1878–1917

POET’S REGION England

Subjects Nature, Animals, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

 Edward  Thomas

Biography

Such prominent critics and authors as Walter de la Mare, Aldous Huxley, Peter SacksSeamus Heaney, and Edna Longley have called Edward Thomas one of England's most important poets. Since 2000, much serious consideration has been given to Thomas's work. Most critics would agree with Andrew Motion, who states that Thomas occupies "a crucial place in the development of twentieth-century poetry" for introducing a modern . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Nature, Animals, Social Commentaries, War & Conflict

POET’S REGION England

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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