On Seeing the Wind at Hope Mansell

By Geoffrey Hill b. 1932 Geoffrey Hill
Whether or not shadows are of the substance
such is the expectation I can
wait to surprise my vision as a wind
enters the valley: sudden and silent
in its arrival, drawing to full cry
the whorled invisibilities, glassen towers
freighted with sky-chaff; that, as barnstorming
powers, rammack the small
orchard; that well-steaded oaks
ride stolidly, that rake the light-leafed ash,
that glowing yew trees, cumbrous, heave aside.
Amidst and abroad tumultuous lumina,
regents, reagents, cloud-fêted, sun-ordained,
fly tally over hedgerows, across fields.

Source: Poetry (May 2006).

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This poem originally appeared in the May 2006 issue of Poetry magazine

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May 2006
 Geoffrey  Hill

Biography

Geoffrey Hill was born in Worcestershire, England in 1932. From a working-class family, Hill attended Oxford where his work was first published by the poet Donald Hall. These poems later collected in For the Unfallen: Poems 1952-1958 (1959), marked an astonishing debut. In dense poems of gnarled syntax and astonishing rhetorical power, Hill planted the seeds of style and concern that he has continued to cultivate over his long . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Landscapes & Pastorals, Nature, Weather

POET’S REGION England

Poetic Terms Alliteration, Imagery, Free Verse, Assonance, Consonance

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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