Infidelity

By Philip White Philip White
“Talking only makes me feel more alone,”
you said once in the car outside the clinic.
Two years later, you spoke the same sentence   
word for word one night after friends had gone.
Within a month, you’d erased yourself    . . .
Erased? “To absent oneself,” I found scribbled on
a wrapper a year later    . . .
                                                                     Now sunlight and tree
shadow rush over the windshield of  the car:
I’m talking with my new wife — then gone, absented.
“Sometimes I feel almost too much joy,”   
you wrote from the balcony of  your cheap
hotel in Paris. “What are you thinking?” she asks.
Light shutters across us. Wherever you are
in me I’m there, though it’s not what you wanted.

Source: Poetry (May 2008).

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This poem originally appeared in the May 2008 issue of Poetry magazine

May 2008
 Philip  White

Biography

Philip White’s collection of poems, The Clearing, was published by Texas Tech in 2007. He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and teaches Shakespeare at Centre College in Danville, Kentucky.

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Marriage & Companionship, Relationships, Men & Women

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Originally appeared in Poetry magazine.

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