Garden

By H. D. 1886–1961 H. D.
I

You are clear
O rose, cut in rock,
hard as the descent of hail.

I could scrape the colour   
from the petals
like spilt dye from a rock.

If I could break you   
I could break a tree.

If I could stir
I could break a tree—
I could break you.


II

O wind, rend open the heat,   
cut apart the heat,   
rend it to tatters.

Fruit cannot drop   
through this thick air—
fruit cannot fall into heat
that presses up and blunts
the points of pears   
and rounds the grapes.

Cut the heat—
plough through it,
turning it on either side   
of your path.

Source: Poetry (March 1915).

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This poem originally appeared in the March 1915 issue of Poetry magazine

March 1915
 H.  D.

Biography

H.D.’s life and work recapitulate the central themes of literary modernism: the emergence from Victorian norms and certainties, the entry into an age characterized by rapid technological change and the violence of two great wars, and the development of literary modes which reflected the disintegration of traditional symbolic systems and the mythmaking quest for new meanings. H.D.’s oeuvre spans five decades of the twentieth . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Activities, Gardening, Weather, Trees & Flowers, Nature

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Imagist

Poetic Terms Free Verse, Imagist

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