Royalty

By Arthur Rimbaud 1854–1891 Arthur Rimbaud

Translated from the French by John Ashbery Read the translator's notes

One fine morning, in the country of a very gentle people, a magnificent man and woman were shouting in the public square. “My friends, I want her to be queen!” “I want to be queen!” She was laughing and trembling. He spoke to their friends of revelation, of trials completed. They swooned against each other.
      In fact they were regents for a whole morning as crimson hangings were raised against the houses, and for the whole afternoon, as they moved toward groves of palm trees.

Source: Poetry (April 2011).

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This poem originally appeared in the April 2011 issue of Poetry magazine

April 2011
 Arthur  Rimbaud

Biography

It would be difficult to overestimate the influence of Arthur Rimbaud’s poetry on subsequent practitioners of the genre. His impact on the Surrealist movement has been widely acknowledged, and a host of poets, from André Breton to André Freynaud, have recognized their indebtedness to Rimbaud’s vision and technique. He was the enfant terrible of French poetry in the second half of the nineteenth century and a major figure in . . .

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POET’S REGION France

Poetic Terms Prose Poem, Symbolist

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