Ovid on Climate Change

By Eliza Griswold b. 1973 Eliza Griswold
Bastard, the other boys teased him,
till Phaethon unleashed the steeds
of Armageddon. He couldn’t hold
their reins. Driving the sun too close
to earth, the boy withered rivers,
torched Eucalyptus groves, until the hills
burst into flame, and the people’s blood
boiled through the skin. Ethiopia,
land of   burnt faces. In a boy’s rage
for a name, the myth of race begins.

NOTES: Read the Q&A with Eliza Griswold about this poem

Source: Poetry (December 2012).

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This poem originally appeared in the December 2012 issue of Poetry magazine

December 2012
 Eliza   Griswold

Biography

Eliza Griswold is a poet and reporter whose work has appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and the New Republic. Her books include the poetry collection Wideawake Field (2007) and the non-fiction title The Tenth Parallel (2010), which examines Christianity and Islam in Asia and Africa. In 2010, Griswold won the Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome for her poetry, and in 2011, . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Youth, Social Commentaries, Race & Ethnicity, Mythology & Folklore, Greek & Roman Mythology

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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