End of the Comedy

By Louis Untermeyer 1885–1977 Louis Untermeyer
Eleven o’clock, and the curtain falls.
The cold wind tears the strands of illusion;
The delicate music is lost
In the blare of home-going crowds
And a midnight paper.

The night has grown martial;
It meets us with blows and disaster.
Even the stars have turned shrapnel,
Fixed in silent explosions.
And here at our door
The moonlight is laid
Like a drawn sword.

Source: Poetry (May 1919).

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This poem originally appeared in the May 1919 issue of Poetry magazine

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May 1919
  • Faun
    by Miriam Allen De Ford
  • Sparrow
    by George O'Neil
  • Kitty
    by Charles Erskine Scott Wood
 Louis  Untermeyer

Biography

Louis Untermeyer was the author, editor or compiler, and translator of more than one hundred books for readers of all ages. He will be best remembered as the prolific anthologist whose collections have introduced students to contemporary American poetry since 1919. The son of an established New York jeweler, Untermeyer's interest in poetry led to friendships with poets from three generations, including many of the century's . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Living, Disappointment & Failure

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

Poetic Terms Free Verse

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