Leave-Taking

By Louise Bogan 1897–1970 Louise Bogan
I do not know where either of us can turn
Just at first, waking from the sleep of each other.
I do not know how we can bear
The river struck by the gold plummet of the moon,
Or many trees shaken together in the darkness.
We shall wish not to be alone
And that love were not dispersed and set free—
Though you defeat me,
And I be heavy upon you.

But like earth heaped over the heart
Is love grown perfect.
Like a shell over the beat of life
Is love perfect to the last.
So let it be the same
Whether we turn to the dark or to the kiss of another;
Let us know this for leavetaking,
That I may not be heavy upon you,
That you may blind me no more.

Originally published in Poetry, August 1922.

Source: Poetry (August 1922).

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This poem originally appeared in the August 1922 issue of Poetry magazine

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August 1922
 Louise  Bogan

Biography

Louise Bogan has been called by some critics the most accomplished woman poet of the twentieth century. Her subtle, restrained style was partially influenced by writers such as Rilke and Henry James, and partially by the English metaphysical poets such as George HerbertJohn Donne, and Henry Vaughan, though she distanced herself from her intellectually rigorous, metaphysical contemporaries. Some critics have placed her in a . . .

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Poem Categorization

SUBJECT Love, Living, Relationships, Time & Brevity, Separation & Divorce, Break-ups & Vexed Love, Realistic & Complicated

POET’S REGION U.S., Mid-Atlantic

SCHOOL / PERIOD Modern

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